The Current Lab

A LINK to the lab manual is here. You can only access it with your e-mail address.


Publications


Here are publications by our laboratory members:

  • Obert, G. T.*, & Miller, S. A. (2021). The net worth of networks and extraversion: Examining personality structure through network models. Personality and Individual Differences, 181. doi: 10.1016/j.paid.2021.111039. (pdf)

  • Reed, B. W.*, Segal, N. L., & Miller, S. A. (2021). Evolutionary perspective on decreases in grief intensity for deceased twin and non-twin relatives: An update. Personality and Individual Differences, 178, xxx - yyy. doi: 10.1016/j.paid.2021.110822 (pdf)

  • Leib, S. I.*, Faith, E. C.*, Vincent, S. R.*, & Miller, S. A. (2021). Police interactions, perceived discrimination, and longitudinal changes in depression in African Americans. Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, 40(1), 27-45. doi: 10.1521/jscp.2021.40.1.27 (link; pdf)

  • Tran, S. T., Grotkowski, K. G.*, Miller, S. A., Reed, B. W.*, Koven, M. L.*, Buscemi, J., & Greenley, R. N. (2021). Hassles predict physical health complaints in undergraduate students: A dynamic structural equation model analysis of daily diary data. Psychology and Health. doi: 10.1080/08870446.2020.1800010. (pdf)

  • Reed, B. W.*, Miller, S. A., Bobak, T. J., Steven, E., & Jason, L. A. (2020). The experience of smoking in recovery settings: An ecological momentary assessment pilot study. Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions. doi: 10.1080/1533256X.2020.1710080. (pdf)

  • Grotkowski, K.*, & Miller, S. A. (2019). Optimists or optimistic: Replication of a taxometric study on optimism. Journal of Research in Personality, 82. doi: 10.1016/j.jrp.2019.103854. (pdf, link, OSF)

  • Miller, S. A., & Grotkowski, K.* (2018). Physiological hyperarousal (2018). In V. Zeigler-Hill & T. K. Shackelford (Eds.). Encyclopedia of Personality and Individual Differences. New York: Springer. doi: 10.1007/978-3-319-28099-8_453-1. (pdf, link)

  • Fowler, D.*, Weber, E.*, Klappa, S.P.*, & Miller, S.A. (2017). Replicating future orientation: Investigating hope, optimism, and their subscales through replication and expansion. Personality and Individual Differences, 116, 22-28. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.paid.2017.04.010 (pdf)

Conferences in 2021-2022

    • Bate, G.*, Buscemni, J., Greenley, R., Tran, S. T., & Miler, S. A. (under review - May 26-29, 2022). Relationships among dimensions of anxiety and depression, hassles, and cortisol in emerging adults. Poster submitted to the 34th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science. Chicago, Illinois.

    • Bitterman, J. B.*, Miller, S. A., Greenley, R., Buscemi, J., & Tran, S. T. (under review -May 26-29, 2022). Latent class analysis of emerging adult perceived stress scale scores during COVID-19. Poster submitted to the 34th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science. Chicago, Illinois.

    • Gandelman, E. M.*, Bloom, R., Bitterman, J. B.*, Kaseda, E. T.*, & Miller, S. A. (under review - May 26-29, 2022). More authetntic and less confident language use in #Hodgkinslymphoma following COVID-19 pandemic onset. Poster submitted to the 34th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science. Chicago, Illinois.

    • Grotkowski*, K. Przepiórka, A., & Miller, S. A. (May 26-29, 2022). Validity evidence for the Polish Negative Mood Regulation scale. Poster submitted to the 34th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science. Chicago, Illinois.

    • Kaseda., E. T.*, Bitterman, J. B., Namuhmuh, K.*, Gandelman, E. M.*, Swenson-Noyes, J.*, Miller, S. A., & Bloom, R.(under review - May 26-29, 2022). Hospitals, hobbies, and hair loss: How adolescents and young adults with cancer use TikTok. Poster submitted to the 34th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science. Chicago, Illinois

    • Khan, A.*, Feinstein, B., Chang, C., & Miller, S. A. (under review - May 26-29, 2022). Measurement invariance of the Heterosexist Harassment, Rejection, and Discrimination Scale in groups that differ by sexual orientation, gender identity, and race/ethnicity. Poster to be submitted to the 34th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science. Chicago, Illinois.

    • Sagan, D. H. S.*, O'Donnell, A. O*, Miller, S. A., Greenley, S. T., Tran, S. T., & Buscemi, J. (under review - May 26-29, 2022). Calories expended moderates the association between daily hassles and anhedonic depression among college students. Poster submitted to the 34th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science. Chicago, Illinois.

    • Zajac, D.* et al. (in progress- May 26-29, 2022). Poster to be submitted to the 34th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science. Chicago, Illinois.

    • Vincent, S.*, Bate, G.*, Leedom, L., Miller, S. A., & Kosson, D. (under review - May 19-22, 2022) Differential network structures of the PCL-R and the PCL:YV. The 9th Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy -- Biennial Conference. Online.

    • Graupman, E.*, Miller, S. A., & Kosson, D. (under review - May 19-22, 2022). Comparing psychopathy subtypes based on restricted and unrestricted samples of offenders. The 9th Meeting of the Society for the Scientific Study of Psychopathy -- Biennial Conference. Online.

    • Segal et al. under review

    • McHugh, M.M.*, Schneider, K.L., & Miller, S. A, (2022, April 6-9). Exercise identity does not predict subsequent physical activity during the Covid-19 pandemic Poster submitted to The The Society of Behavioral Medicine Annual Meeting, Baltimore, MD.

    • Loiacono, B.*, Miller, S. A., Mansfield, D.*, Greenley, R. N., Tran, S., & Buscemi, J. (under review - April, 2022). The influence of COVID-19 Impact and Exposure on Body Mass Index, Diet, Physical Activity, and Marijuana Use in a Diverse Sample of Emerging Adults. Poster submitted to the 43rd Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

    • Mansfield, D.*, Miller, S.A., Loiacono, B.*, Greenley, R. N., Tran, S., & Buscemi, J. (under review - April, 2022). Negative Mood Regulation Expectancies and Perceived Stress in Emerging Adults during COVID-19: The Role of Chronic Health Conditions. Poster submitted to the 43rd Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions of the Society of Behavioral Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

    • Jagpal, A.*, Miller, S. A., Buscemi, J., Greenley, R.N., & Tran, S.T. (under review - April, 2022). Pilot Study Examining Sympathetic Activation and Life Stressors in Youth with Chronic Medical Conditions. Poster submitted to the Society of Pediatric Psychology 2021 Annual Convention. Phoenix, Arizona.

    • Khan, A.*, & Miller, S. A. (April, 2022). Latent classes of adverse childhood experiences differentially experience health outcomes. Poster to be presented at 94th Annual Convention of the Midwestern Psychological Association. Chicago, Illinois.

    • Bate, G.*, Obert, G. T.*, & Miller, S. A. ( April, 2022). Is new btetter?: Gaussian-graphical model outperforms latent-variable network of Big Five. Poster to be presented at the 94th Annual Convention of the Midwestern Psychological Association. Chicago, Illinois.

    • Abraham, M.*, Klipfel, K. M., Guidotti Breting, L., Breting, E., & Miller, S. A. (February, 2022). Distinct patterns of neuropsychological performance in adult ADHD and psychiatric comorbidities. Poster to be presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the International Neuropsychological Society. New Orleans, Louisiana.

    • Leib, S. I.*, Chin, E., & Miller, S. A. (February, 2022). Latent structure of working memory and emotion regulation in pediatric ADHD. Poster to be presented at the 50th Annual Meeting of the International Neuropsychological Society. New Orleans, Louisiana.

    • Maigler, K. C., Buhr, T. J., Park, C. S., Miller, S. A., Kozlowski, D. A., & Marr, R. A. (November, 2021). The absence of NEP-like amyloid-beta degrading enzymes improves motor/memory performance post brain injury in mice. Poster presented at Society for Neuroscience 2021 Meeting. Online.

    • Gandelman, E.*, Borge, E.*, Killeen, T., Santa Ana, E., Miller, S. A., & Back, S.E. (November, 2021). What’s the Process in Processing?: Linguistic Analysis of Cohesiveness during COPE Therapy for PTSD and Substance Use Disorders. Poster presented at the 55th Annual Convention of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. Online

Karolina (Karol) Grotkowski, M.S, is a sixth year Clinical Psychology Ph.D. student at RFUMS. She earned her B.S. in Neuroscience from the University ofIllinois at Chicago. Karol’s research interests include the development of personality and personality disorders, influence of social contexts on personality, and statistical methods. She has been published in The Family Journal on research she has done on the Marriage Protection Theory as it relates to couples in long distance and proximal relationships. She also presented her findings during the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies Conference in 2016. Karol joined the lab in the fall of 2016. A copy of her CV is here. Karol has created a web page dedicated to her dissertation, which is A Polish Translation and Adaptation of the Negative Mood Regulation Expectancies Scale. She has successfully defended her dissertation and is completing her clinical internship at Duke University.


Tucker is no ordinary lab animal (actually, he's never been IN the lab). However, he's helped us out with our models. There's debate as to whether his name comes from his ear often being tucked down or is in honor of Ledyard R Tucker. The Tucker-Lewis Index (aka, the Non-Normed Fit Index) is:


χ2/df(Null Model) - χ2/df(Proposed Model)

_________________________________

χ2/df(Null Model) - 1

Sophie Leib, M.S. is a fifth year student on the neuropsychology track of the Clinical Psychology Ph.D program. She started at RFUMS in August of 2017. She earned a Bachelor’s degree in Psychology and Spanish from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in May of 2017. Sophie is interested in the effects of emotion and culture on neuropsychological and functioning. A copy of her CV is here. During the summer of 2021, she successfully defended her dissertation and she will apply for internship in the fall.



Gregory Obert, M.Ed., M.S. is a fifth year student in the Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program. He started at RFUMS in August of 2017. He has devoted his life to assisting others through therapy, and has enhanced the lives of many clients during his time as a counselor. His combination of cognitive behavioral and client-centered therapeutic approaches has provided his clients with a unique setting to explore ways to improve themselves. Gregory has worked in many different settings, including inpatient units, domestic violence shelters, community mental health centers, and private practices. He is a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC) in Illinois and received his M.Ed. in Community Counseling from DePaul University in Chicago. A copy of his CV is here. During the summer of 2021, Greg successfully proposed his dissertation. He will apply for his clinical internship in the fall.


His site is: www.GregoryTObert.com

Erin Gandelman, M.S. is a fourth-year Clinical Psychology Ph.D. student at RFUMS. She concentrated in psychology and poetry at Sarah Lawrence College graduated in May of 2018. She has worked as an undergraduate researcher at the Yale University West Haven VA Hospital for the past two years and has been awarded a research fellowship for the 2018 Summer Research Training Program at the Medical University of South Carolina. Erin has been published in the Journal of Dual Diagnosis, The American Journal on Addictions, and Alcohol and Alcoholism. She is very interested in the intersections of life narratives, memory, and personality as well as the applications of novel quantitative methodology to psychological questions. Erin ultimately plans to conduct research to better understand and evaluate treatment practices for mood and trauma related disorders. A copy of her CV is here.

George Bate, M.S. is a third year Clinical Psychology Ph.D. student at RFUMS. He earned his B.S. in Psychology from Loyola University Chicago and his A.A. from Oakton Community College. Before working in the Personality and Emotion Research Lab, he worked as a research assistant in Dr. Maryse RichardsRisk and Resilience Lab and in Dr. Scott Tindale’s Group Decision-Making Lab at Loyola University Chicago. George has been published by Oxford University Press and in Eye on Psi Chi and Inquires Journal. His research interests include risk factors for anxiety and depression in marginalized populations and the conceptualization of anxiety and depressive symptoms using novel statistical methodology. In the future, George aims to conduct clinically relevant research regarding anxiety and depression and apply this research in a clinical setting. A copy of his CV is here.

Aaminah Kha, HBSc. is a second year as a Clinical Psychology Ph.D. student at RFUMS in Fall 2020. She earned an Honors Bachelor of Science degree at the University of Toronto with a Specialist in Psychology and a minor in Professional Writing and Communication. She worked as a Research Assistant in the Self-Knowledge and Interpersonal Perception Lab and the Regulatory and Affective Dynamics Lab at the University of Toronto. She is interested in the emotional experience of individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds who face mental illness. She is also interested in how to adapt psychotherapies to meet the needs of individuals from diverse cultural backgrounds. She is currently working as a Research Assistant at Punjabi Community Health Services on an innovative nationwide study being conducted by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) to create a culturally adapted Cognitive Behavior Therapy for South Asians in Canada. Her CV may be found here.

Victoria Sardella, B.S. is a second year student in the Clinical Counseling M.A. program. She earned her B.S. in Psychology in May 2020 from Loyola University Chicago. Before working in the Personality and Emotion Research Lab, she worked as a research assistant in Dr. Collen Conley’s IMPACT Lab (Improving Mental-health and Promoting Adjustment through Critical Transitions) and has worked with Dr. Bradley Riemann and Dr. Nader Amir in the Cognitive Bias Modification Lab through Rogers Behavioral Health. Her research interests include exploring the effects of personality on treatment outcomes in OCD, anxiety, mood, trauma and eating disorders. Victoria plans to pursue a PhD program in the future and wishes to apply her research in clinical settings. Her CV may be found here.

Elliot Borge volunteers in the lab. He is working on covariance pattern mixture models and how they work in openness and cognition data.

This could be you! I will consider taking an individual to pursuit graduate training in clinical psychology at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science to be Research Assistants in the Personality and Emotion Research Laboratory staring in the Fall of 2022. Knowledge of contemporary personality and emotion theory and research, statistics, and/or computer programming is helpful. If you're interested, please contact me.

Below, you'll find stats resources from my old web page


Factor Analysis Materials

HARKing

  • Anderson, D. R., Burnham, K. P., Gould, W. R., & Cherry, S. (2001). Concerns about finding effects that are actually spurious. Wildlife Society Bulletin, 29, 311–316. (pdf)

  • Bosco, F. A., Aguinis, H., Field, J. G., Pierce, C. A., & Dalton, D. R. (in press). HARKing’s threat to organizational research: Evidence from primary and meta-analytic sources. Personnel Psychology. (pdf)

  • Gardner, M. R. (1982). Predicting novel facts. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 33, 1-15. (pdf)

  • Harker, D. (2008). On the predilections for predictions. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 59, 429-453. (pdf)

  • Hitchcock, C., & Sober, E. (2004). Prediction versus accommodation and the risk of overfitting. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 55, 1-34. (pdf)

  • Kerr, N. L. (1998). HARKing: Hypothesizing After the Results are Known. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 2(3), 196-217. (pdf)

  • Kerr, N. L. (2011). HARK! A herald sings…but who’s listening? In R. M. Arkin (Ed.), Most Underappreciated: 50 Prominent Social Psychologists Talk About Hidden Gems. (pp. 126-131). New York, NY: Oxford University Press. (pdf)

  • Leung, K. (2011). Presenting post hoc hypotheses as a priori: Ethical and theoretical issues. Management and Organization Review, 7, 471-479. (pdf)

  • Lipton, P. (2001). Inference to the best explanation. In W. H. Newton-Smith (Ed.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Science (pp. 184-193). Walden, MA: Blackwell Publishers Ltd. (pdf)

  • Lipton, P. (2005). Testing hypotheses: Prediction and prejudice. Science, 307, 219-221. (pdf)

  • Roese, N. J., & Vohs, K. D. (2012). Hindsight bias. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7(5), 411-426.(pdf)

  • Simon, H. A. (1955). Prediction and hindsight as confirmatory science. Philosophy of Science, 22, 227-230. (pdf)

  • Wagenmakers, E.-J., Wetzels, R., Borsboom, D., & van der Maas, H. L. J. (2011). Why psychologists must change the way they analyze their data: The case of psi. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 100, 426–432. (pdf)

  • Wagenmakers, E. J., Wetzels, R., Borsboom, D., van der Maas, H. L., & Kievit, R. A. (2012). An agenda for purely confirmatory research. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7(6), 632-638. (pdf)

  • White, R. (2003). The epistemic advantage of prediction over accommodation. Mind, 112, 653-683. (pdf)

John Ioannidis's Work that I have Cited

  • Button, K. S., Ioannidis, J. P. A., Mokrysz, C., Nosek, B. A., Flint, J., Robinson, E. S. J., & Munafó, M. R. (2013). Power failure: Why small sample size undermines the reliability of neuroscience. Nature Neuroscience, 14, 365-376 (pdf) (errata pdf)

  • Button, K. S., Ioannidis, J. P. A., Mokrysz, C., Nozek, B. A., Flint, J., Robinson, E. S. J., & Munafò, M. R. (2013). Empirical evidence for low reproducibility indicates low pre-study odds. Nature Neuroscience, 14, 877. (pdf)

  • Fanelli, D., & Ioannidis J. P. A. (2013) U.S. studies may overestimate effect sizes in softer research. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110, 15031–15036. (pdf)

  • Chavalarias, D., Wallach, J. D., Li, A. H. T., & Ioannidis J. P. A. (2016). Evolution of reporting p values in the biomedical literature, 1990-2015. Journal of the American Medical Association, 315(11), 1141-1148. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A. (1998). Effect of the statistical significance of results on the time to completion and publication of randomized efficacy trials. Journal of the American Medical Association, 279(4), 281–286. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2005). Why most published research findings are false. PLoS Medicine, 2, e124. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2005). Concentration of the most-cited papers in the scientific literature: Analysis of journal ecosystems. PLoS One, 1. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2005). Contradicted and initially stronger effects in highly cited clinical research. Journal of the American Medical Association, 294, 218-228. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A., Trikalinos, T. A., & Zintzaras, E. (2006). Extreme between-study homogeneity in meta-analysis could offer useful insights. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 59(10), 1023-1032. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A., Patsopoulos, N. A., & Evangelou, E. (2007). Uncertainty in heterogeneity estimates in meta-analysis. British Medical Journal, 335(7626), 914-916. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2008). Why most discovered true associations are inflated. Epidemiology, 19, 640-648. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2011). More time for research: Fund people, not projects. Nature, 477, 429-531 (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2011). Excess significance bias in the literature on brain volume abnormalities. Archives of General Psychiatry, 68, 773–780. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2012). Scientific communication is down at the moment, please check again later. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 267-270. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2012). Why science is not necessarily self-correcting. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7(6), 645-654. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2013). Scientific inbreeding and same-team replication: Type D personality as an example. Journal of Psychosomatic Research, 73(6), 408-410.(pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2014). Estimates of the continuously publishing core in the scientific workforce. PLoS One, e101698. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2014). How to make more published research true. PLoS Medicine, 11(10), e1001747. doi: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001747. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2016) Why most clinical research is not useful. PLoS Medicine, 13(6): e1002049. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1002049 (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A., Cappelleri, J. C., & Lau, J. (1998) Issues in comparisons between meta-analyses and large trials. Journal of the American Medical Association, 279, 1089–93. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A., Fanelli, D., Dunne, D. D., & Goodman, S. N. (2015). Meta-research: Evaluation and Improvement of research methods and practices. PLoS Biology, 13(10), e1002264. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A., & Garber, A. M. (2012). Individualized cost effectiveness analysis. PLoS Medicine, 8(7), e1001058. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A., Greenland, S., Hlatky, M. A.,. Khoury, M. J., Macleod, M. R., Moher, D., Schultz, K. F., & Tibshirani, R. (2014). Increasing value and reducing waste in research design, conduct, and analysis. The Lancet, 383, 166-175. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A., & Khoury, M. J. (2011). Improving validation practices in “omics” research. Science, 334, 1230–1232. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A., & Lau, J. (2001). Evolution of treatment effects over time: empirical insight from recursive cumulative meta-analyses. Proceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United States of America, 98(3), 831–6. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A., & Panagiotou O. A. (2011). Comparison of effect sizes associated with biomarkers reported in highly cited individual articles and in subsequent meta-analyses. Journal of the American Medical Association, 305, 2200–2210. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A., Tarone, R., & McLaughlin, J. K. (2011). The false-positive to false-negative ratio in epidemiologic studies. Epidemiology, 22(4), 450-456. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A., & Trikalinos, T. A. (2005). Early extreme contradictory estimates may appear in published research: The Proteus phenomenon in molecular genetics research and randomized trials. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 58, 543-549. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A., & Trikalinos, T. A. (2007). An exploratory test for an excess of significant findings. Clinical Trials, 4, 245–253. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J. P. A., & Trikalinos, T. A. (2007). The appropriateness of asymmetry tests for publication bias in meta-analyses: A large survey. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 176, 1091-1096. (pdf)

  • Nicholson, J. M., & Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2012). Research grants: Conform and be funded. Nature, 492, 34-36. (pdf).

  • Smit, Y. Huibers, M. J. H., Ioannidis, J. P. A., van Dyck, R., van Tilburg, W., & Arntz, A. (2012). The effectiveness of long-term psychoanalytic psychotherapy - A meta-analysis of controlled trials. Clinical Psychology Review, 32(2), 81-92. (pdf)

  • Tatsioni, A, Bonitsis, N. G., & Ioannidis, J. P. A. (2005). Persistence of contradicted claims in the literature. Journal of the American Medical Association, 298(21), 2517-2526. (pdf)

  • Young, N. S., Ioannidis, J. P. A., & Al-Ubaydli, O. (2008). Why current publication practices may distort science. PLoS Medicine, 5, 1418-1422. (pdf)

Latent Variable Interactions and Nonlinear Effects

  • Bauer, D.J., Baldasaro, R. & Gottfredson, N.C. (2012). Diagnostic procedures for detecting nonlinear relationships between latent variables. Structural Equation Modeling: A Multidisciplinary Journal, 19, 157-177. (pdf)

  • Kelava, A., Moosbrugger, H., Dimitruk, P., & Schermelleh-Engel, K. (2008). Multicollinearity and MSEM for moderation missing constraints: A comparison of three approaches for the analysis of latent nonlinear effects. Methodology, 4, 51-66. (pdf)

  • Kelava, A., Werner, C., Schermelleh-Engel, K., Moosbrugger, H., Zapf, D., Ma, Y., Cham, H., Aiken, L. S., & West, S. G. (2011). Advanced nonlinear structural equation modeling: Theoretical properties and empirical application of the LMS and QML estimators. Structural Equation Modeling, 18, 465-491. (pdf)

  • Kenny, D. A., & Judd, C. M. (1984). Estimating the nonlinear and interactive effects of latent variables. Psychological Bulletin, 96, 201-210. (pdf)

  • Klein, A. G., & Muthén, B. (2007). Quasi-maximum likelihood of structural equation modeling with multiple interaction and quadratic effects. Multivariate Behavioral Research, 42, 647- 673. (pdf)

  • Little, T. D., Bovaird, J. A., & Widaman, K. F. (2006). On the merits of orthogonalizing powered and product terms: Implications for modeling interactions. Structural Equation Modeling, 13, 497-519. (pdf)

  • Marsh, H. W., Wen, Z., & Hau, K.-T. (2004). Structural equation models of latent interactions: Evaluation of alternative estimation strategies and indicator construction. Psychological Methods, 9, 275-300. (pdf)

  • Moosbrugger, H., Schermelleh-Engel, K., Kelava, A., & Klein, A. G. (2009). Testing multiple nonlinear effects in structural equation modeling: A comparison of alternative estimation approaches. In T. Teo & M. S. Khine (Eds.), Structural equation modeling in educational research: Concepts and applications (pp. 103-135). Rotterdam: Sense Publishers. (pdf)

  • Pek, J., Sterba, S.K., Kok, B.E. & Bauer, D.J. (2009). Estimating and visualizing nonlinear relations among latent variables: A semiparametric approach. Multivariate Behavioral Research, 44, 407-436. (pdf)

  • Steinmetz, H., Davidov, E., & Schmidt, P. (2011). Three approaches to estimate latent interaction effects: Intention and perceived behavioral control in the theory of planned behavior. Methodological Innovations Online, 6(1), 95-110. (pdf)

Longitudinal Analysis with Changing Scales

  • Edwards, M.C., & Wirth, R.J. (2009). Measurement and the study of change. Research in Human Development, 6, 74-96 . (pdf)

  • McArdle, J. J., Grimm, K. J., Hamagami, F., Bowles, R. P., & Meredith, W. (2009). Modeling life-span growth curves of cognition using longitudinal data with multiple samples and changing scales of measurement. Psychological Methods, 14(2), 126-149. (pdf)

  • Pettit, G. S., Keiley, M. K., Laird, R. D., Bates, R. D., & Dodge, K. A. (2007) Predicting the developmental course of mother-reported monitoring across childhood and adolescence from early practive parenting. Journal of Family Psychology, 21(2), 206-217. (pdf) (Mplus slides)

Neuroscience Statistics

  • Aarts, E., Verhage, M., Veenvliet, J. V., Dolan, C. V., & van der Sluis, S. (2014). A solution to dependency: Using multilevel analysis to accommodate nested data. Nature Neuroscience, 17(4), 491-496. (pdf)

  • Bennett, C. A., Baird, A. A., Miller, M. B., & Wolford, G. L. (2009). Neural correlates of interspecies perspective taking in the post-mortem Atlantic Salmon: An argument for multiple comparisons correction. Poster. (pdf)

  • Bennett, C. A., Baird, A. A., Miller, M. B., & Wolford, G. L. (2009). Neural correlates of interspecies perspective taking in the post-mortem Atlantic Salmon: An argument for proper multiple comparisons correction. Journal of Serendipitous and Unexpected Results, 1(1), 1-5. (pdf)

  • Button, K. S., Ioannidis, J. P. A., Mokrysz, C., Nosek, B. A., Flint, J., Robinson, E. S. J., & Munafó, M. R. (2013). Power failure: Why small sample size undermines the reliability of neuroscience. Nature Neuroscience, 14, 365-376 (pdf) (errata pdf)

  • Kim, J., Zhu, W., Chang, L., Bentler, P., & Ernst, T. (2007). Unified structural equation modeling approach for the analysis of multisubject, multivariate functional MRI data. Human Brain Mapping, 28, 85-93. (pdf)

  • Nieuwenhuis, S., Forstmann, B. U., & Wagenmakers, E.-J. (2011). Erroneous analysis of interactions in neuroscience: A problem of significance. Nature Neuroscience, 14(9), 1105-1107. (pdf)

  • Voodoo Correlations

    • Diener, E. (2009). Editor's introduction to Vul et al. (2009) and comments. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 4(3), 272-273. (pdf)

    • Vul, E., Harris, C., Winkielman, P., & Pashler, H. (2009). Puzzingly high correlations in fMRI studies of emotion, personality, and social cognition. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 4(3), 274-290. (pdf)

    • Nichols, T. E.. & Poline, J.-B. (2009). Commentary on Vul et al.'s (2009) "Puzzingly high correlations in fMRI studies of emotion, personality, and social cognition." Perspectives on Psychological Science, 4(3), 291-293. (pdf)

    • Yarkoni, T. (2009). Big correlations in little studies: Inflated fMRI correlations reflect low statistical power -- Commentary on Vul et al. (2009). Perspectives on Psychological Science, 4(3), 294-298. (pdf)

    • Lieberman, M. T., Berkman, E. T., & Wager, T. D. (2009). Correlations in social neuroscience aren't voodoo: Commentary on Vul et al. (2009). Perspectives on Psychological Science, 4(3), 299-307. (pdf)

    • Lazar, N. A. (2009) Discussion of "Puzzingly high correlations in fMRI studies of emotion, personality, and social cognition" by Vul et al. (2009). Perspectives on Psychological Science, 4(3), 308-309. (pdf)

    • Lindquist, M. A., & Gelman, A. (2009). Correlations and multiple comparisons in functional imagining: A statistical perspective (Commentary on Vul et al., 2009). Perspectives on Psychological Science, 4(3), 310-313. (pdf)

    • Barrett, L. F. (2009) Understanding the mind by measuring the braing: Lessons from measuring behavior (Commentary on Vul et al., 2009). Perspectives on Psychological Science, 4(3), 314-318. (pdf)

    • Vul, E., Harris, C., Winkielman, P., & Pashler, H. (2009). Reply to comments on "Puzzingly high correlations in fMRI studies of emotion, personality, and social cognition. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 4(3), 319-324. (pdf)

  • Ricean Distribution Materials

    • Gudbjartsson, H., & Patz, S. (1995). The Rician distribution of noisy MRI data. Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, 34(6), 910-914. (pdf)

    • Lauwers, L., Barbé, K., Van Moer, W., & Pintelon, R. (2009, May 5-7) Estimating the parameters of a Rice distribution: A Bayesian approach. Proceedings of the International Instrumentation and Measurement Technology Conference. (pp. 114-117). Singapore. (pdf)

    • Rice, S. O. (1944). Mathematical analysis of random noise. Bell System Technical Journal, 23(3), 282-332. (pdf, scan)

    • Sijbers, J., den Dekker, A. J., Scheunders, P., & Van Dyck, D. (1998). Maximum likelihood estimation of Rician distribution parameters. IEEE Transactions on Medical Imaging, 17(3), 357-361. (pdf)

    • Sijbers, J., den Dekker, A. J., Van Dyck, D., & Raman, E. (1998, February 11-14). Estimation of signal and noise from Rician distributed data. Proceedings of of the International Conference on Signal Processing and Communications (pp. 140-142). Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain. (pdf)

Pilot Studies

    • Arain, M., Campbell, M. J., Cooper, C. L., & Lancaster, G. A. (2010). What is a pilot or feasibility study? A review of current practice or editorial policy. BMC Medical Research Methodology, 10, 67. (pdf)

    • Arnold, D. M., Burns, K. E. A., Adhikari, N. K. J., Kho, M. E., Meade, M. O., & Cook, D. J. (2009). The design and interpretation of pilot trials in clinical research and critical care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 37, 1, S69-S74. (pdf)

    • Grimes, D. A., & Schultz, K. F. (2002). Descriptive studies: What they can and cannot do. The Lancet, 359(9301), 145-149. (pdf).

    • Kraemer, H.C., Mintz, J., Noda, A., Tinklenberg, J., & Yesavge, J.A. (2006). Caution regarding the use of pilot studies to guide power calculations for study proposals. Archives of General Psychiatry, 63, 484–489. (pdf)

    • Lancaster, G. A., Dodd, S., & Williamson, P. R. (2004).. Design and analysis of pilot studies: recommendations for good practice.Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 10(2), 307-312. (pdf)

    • Leon, A. C., Davis, L. L., & Kraemer, H. C. (2011). The role and interpretation of pilot studies in clinical research. Journal of Psychiatric Research, 45(5), 626-629. (pdf)

    • Thabane, L., Ma, J., Chu, R., Cheng, J., Ismaila, A., Rios, L. P., Robson, R., Thabane, M., Giangregorio, L. & Goldsmith, C. H. (2010). A tutorial on pilot studies: the what, why and how. BMC Medical Research Methodology, 10, 1. (pdf)

Replication Crisis (non-comprehensive, updated periodically):

  • Hanson, R. C. (1958). Evidence and procedure characteristics of "reliable" propositions in social science. American Journal of Sociology, 63(4), 357-370. (pdf)

  • Kahneman, D. (2014). A new etiquette for replication. Social Psychology, 45(4), 310-311. (pdf)

  • Nosek et al. (2015, June 26). Scientific standards: Promoting an open science research culture. Science, 348(6242),

1422-1425. (pdf) (Supplementary material)


Scientific Utopia

  • Psychological Inquiry, 2012

    • Nosek, B. A., & Bar-Anan, Y. (2012), Scientific utopia: I. Opening scientific communication. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 217-243. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.692215 (pdf)

    • Adolph, K. E., Gilmore, R. O., Freeman, C., Sanderson, P., & Millman, D. (2012). Toward open behavioral science. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 244-247. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.705133. (pdf)

    • Assendorpf, J. B. (2012). Does open scientific communication increase the quality of knowledge? Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 248-250. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.700578. (pdf)

    • Cirasella, J. (2012). A librarian's defense of the practical over the perfect in scholarly communication. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 251-252. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.706203. (pdf)

    • Cooper, J. (2012). Missteps on the road to a scientific utopia. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 253-255. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.704802. (pdf)

    • Crocker, J. (2012). Improving science by improving scientific communication: The view from the APA publication and communication board. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 256-257. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.702371. (pdf)

    • Dumming, D. (2012). What do we really want? Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 258-260. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.704803. (pdf)

    • Fendley, P. (2012). Seeking the road to utopia. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 261-262. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.705130. (pdf)

    • Giner-Sorolla, R. (2012). Will we march to utopia, or be dragged there? Past failures and hopes for publishing our science. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 263-266. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.706506. (pdf)

    • Ioannidis, J. P. (2012). Scientific communication is down at the moment, please check again later. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 267-270. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.699427. (pdf)

    • Iyer, R., & Graham, J. (2012). Leveraging the wisdom of crowds in a data-rich utopia. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 271-273. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.705244. (pdf)

    • King, L. A. (2012). A dinosaur comments on the coming apocalypse: Does anybody else see that asteroid? Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 274-276. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.704804. (pdf)

    • Lilienfeld, C. O. (2012). Scientific utopia or scientific dystopia? Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 277-280. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.704807. (pdf)

    • Mooneyham, B. W., Franklin, M. S., Mrazek, M. D., & Schooler, J. W. (2012). Moderinzing science: Comments on Nosek and Bar-Anan (2012). Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 281-284. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.705246. (pdf)

    • Moore, D. A., & Tenney, E. R. (2012). Cheaper and better: Why scientific advancement demands the more to open access publishing. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 285-286. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.705247. (pdf)

    • Mudditt, A., & Hogg, M. A. (2012). Scientific utopia: That which cannot exist? Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 287-290. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.704855. (pdf)

    • Nelson, L. D., Simmons, J. P., & Simonsohn, U. (2012). Let's publish fewer papers. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 291-293. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.705245. (pdf)

    • Petty, R. E. (2012). Let's try and fix the current publishing system before making dramatic changes. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 294-297. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.705132. (pdf)

    • Reis, H. T. (2012). The future of scientific publication in psychology: Utopias and dystopias. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 298-300. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.704854. (pdf)

    • Saxe, R. (2012). How should we manage peer review and why? Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 301-302. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.707635. (pdf)

    • Spellman, B. A. (2012). Scientific utopia ... or too much information? Comment on Nosek and Bar-Anan. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 303-304. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.701161. (pdf)

    • Yarkoni, T. (2012). Beginning at Nosek and Bar-Anan's end: Let's put open evaluation first. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 305-307. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.706204. (pdf)

    • Nosek, B. A., & Bar-Anan, Y. (2012). Scientific communication is changing and scientists should lead the way. Psychological Inquiry, 23(3), 308-314. doi: 10.1080/1047840X.2012.717907.(pdf)

  • Other Readings

    • Nosek, B. A., Spies, J. R., & Motyl, M. (2012). Scientific utopia: II. Restructuring incentives and practices to promote truth over publishability. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7(6), 615-631. doi: 10.1177/1745691612459058. (pdf)

    • Miguel, E., Camerer, C., Casey, K., Cohen, J., Esterling, K. M., Gerber, A., Glennerster, R., Green, D. P., Humphreys, M., Imbens, G., Laitin, D., Madon, T., Nelson, L., Nosek, B. A., Peterson, N., Sedlmayer, R., Simmons, J. P., Simonsohn, U., & van der Laan, M. (2014). Promoting transparency in social science research. Science, 343(6166). 30-31.(pdf)

  • Links

Other Readings


Articles I've Told At Least Ten People to Read

  • De Groot, A. D. (1956/2014). The meaning of "significance" for different types of research. Translated and annotated by Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, Denny Borsboom, Josine Verhagen, Roger Kievit, Marjan Bakker, Angelique Cramer, Dora Matzke, Don Mellenbergh, and Han L. J. van der Maas. Acta Psychologica, 148, 188-194. (pdf)

  • Funder, D. C, Levine, J. M., Mackie, D. M., Morf, C. C, Vazire, S., & West, S. G. (2014). Improving the dependability of research in personality and social psychology: Recommendations for research and educational practice. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 18, 3 - 12 (pdf)

  • Gelman, A., & Stern, H. (2006). The difference between "significant" and "not significant" is not itself statistically significant. The American Statistician, 60(4), 328-331. (pdf)

  • Ioannidis, J.P.A. (2005). Why most published research findings are false. PLoS Medicine, 2(8), e124. (pdf)

  • Lykken, D. T. (1968). Statistical significance in psychological research, 70(3, part 1), 151-159. (pdf)

  • MacCallum, R. C., Zhang, S., Preacher, K. J., & Rucker, D. D. (2002). On the practice of dichotomization of quantitative variables. Psychological Methods, 7, 19-40. (pdf)

  • Murayama, K., Pekrun, R., & Fiedler, K. (2014). Research practices that can prevent an inflation of false-positive rates. Personality and Social Psychology Review, 18(2), 107-118. (pdf)

  • Rosnow, R. L., & Rosenthal, R. (1989). Statistical procedures and the justification of knowledge in psychological science. American Psychologist, 44(10), 1276-1284. (pdf)

  • Wagenmakers, E.-J., Wetzels, R., Borsboom, DD., van der Maas, H. L. J., & Kievit, R. A. (2012).An agenda for purely confirmatory research. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 7(6), 632-638. (pdf)

Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling References (a page with a lot of references)


Network Analysis References

    • Denny Borsboom

      • Borsboom, D. (2008). Psychometric perspectives on diagnostic systems. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 64, 1089-1108. (pdf)

      • Borsboom, D., & Cramer, A. O. J. (2013). Network analysis: An integrative approach to the structure of psychopathology. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 9, 91-121. (pdf)

      • Borsboom, D., Cramer, A. O. J., Schmittman, V. D., Epskamp, S., & Waldrop, L. K. (2011). The small world of psychopathology. PLOS ONE, 6(11), e27407. (pdf)

      • Bringham, L. F., Vissers, N., Wichers, M., Geschwind, N., Kuppens, P., Peeters, F., Borsboom, D., & Tuerlinckx, F. (2013). A network approach to psychopathology: New insights into clinical longitudinal data. PLOS ONE, 8(4), e60188 (pdf)

      • Cramer, A. O. J., .Borsboom, D., Aggen, S. H., & Kendler, K. S. (2012). The pathoplasticity of dysphoric episodes. Differential impact of stressful life events on the pattern of depressive symptom inter-correlations. Psychological Medicine, 42(5), 957-965. (pdf)

      • Cramer, A. O. J., Waldorp, L. J., van der Maas, H., & Borsboom, D. (2010). Comorbidity: A network perspective. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 33, 137-193.(pdf)

      • Costantini, G., Epskamp, S., Borsboom, D., Perugini, M, Mõttus, R., Waldorp, L. J., & Cramer, A. O. J. (in press). State of the aRt personality research: A tutorial on network analysis of personality data in R. Journal of Research in Personality. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jrp.2014.07.003. (pdf)

      • Epskamp, S., Cramer, A.O.J., Waldorp, L.J., Schmittmann, V.D. and Borsboom, D. (2012) qgraph: Network Visualizations of Relationshipsin Psychometric Data.Journal of Statistical Software, 48(4), 1-18. (pdf)

      • Frewen, P. A., Scmittman, V. D., Bringmann, L. F., & Borsboom, D. (2013). Perceived causal relations between anxiety, posttraumatic stress, and depression: Extension to moderation, mediation, and network analysis. European Journal of Psychotraumatology, 4, 20656. (pdf)

      • Schmittman, V. D., Cramer, A. O. J., Waldorp, L. J., Epskamp, S., Kievit, R. A., and Borsboom, D. (2011). Deconstructing the construct: A network perspective on psychological phenomena. New Ideas in Psychology, 31(1), 43-53. (pdf)

      • van Borkulo, C. D, Borsboom, D., Epskamp, S., Blanken, T. F., Boschloo, L., Schoevers, R. A., & Waldorp, L. J. (2014).A new method for constructing networks from binary data. Scientific Reports, 4, 5918, DOI: 10.1038/srep05918 (pdf)

      • The Psychosystems Project link

    • Tom Snijders

    • Stanley Wasserman

    • Software Packages

    • More to come...

Not exactly statistical per se, but... Paul Meehl related articles

    • Meehl's James McKeen Cattell Fellow Award from the American Psychological Society (now Association for Psychological Science) delivered May 23, 1998, Washington, D.C., entitled "The Power of Quantitative Thinking" (pdf)

    • "In appreciation of" link

    • Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 11, Issue 1 (2004) [in honor of Meehl]

      • Paul Meehl’s search for the optimal epistemology for the behavioral and social sciences (pdf)

      • Paul Meehl and the evolution of statistical methods in psychology (pdf)

      • The myth of open concepts: Meehl’s analysis of construct meaning versus black box essentialism (pdf)

      • Sir Karl, Sir Ronald, (Sir) Paul, and the human element in the progress of soft psychology (pdf)

      • Comment on “Theoretical risks and tabular asterisks: Sir Karl, Sir Ronald, and the slow progress of soft psychology” (pdf)

      • Falsification and the protective belt surrounding entity-postulating theories (pdf)

      • Taking theoretical risks in a world of directional predictions (pdf)

      • Theoretical risks and tabular asterisks: Sir Karl, Sir Ronald, and the slow progress of soft psychology (pdf)

      • Another quasi-30 years of slow progress (pdf)

      • The philosophical legacy of Meehl (1978): confirmation theory, theory quality, and scientific epistemology (pdf)

      • Paul Everett Meehl (pdf)

      • A few dissents from a magnificent piece of work (pdf)

      • Tabular asterisks, Paul Meehl, and looking at the data (pdf)

      • Commentary on Meehl (pdf)

      • Constructs, operational definition, and operational analysis (pdf)

      • Commentary on Meehl’s theoretical risks and tabular asterisks: Sir Karl, Sir Ronald, and the slow progress of soft psychology (pdf)

      • The fallacy of the null hypothesis in soft psychology (pdf)

      • Statistical significance testing, construct validity, and clinical versus actuarial judgment: an interesting (seeming) paradox (pdf)

    • Psychological Methods, Volume 7, Issue 3 (2002)

      • The Path Analysis Controversy: A new statistical approach to strong appraisal of verisimilitude (pdf)

      • Comments on the Meehl-Waller (2002) procedure for appraisal of path analysis models (pdf)

      • The priority of just-identified, recursive models (pdf)

      • Commentary on Meehl and Waller's (2002) Path Analysis and Verisimilitude (pdf)

      • Risky tests, verisimilitude, and path analysis (pdf)

    • Psychological Inquiry, Volume 1, Issue 2 (1990)

      • Editor's Note (pdf)

      • Appraising and Amending Theories: The Strategy of Lakatosian Defense and Two Principles that Warrant It (pdf)

      • The Meehilan Corroboration-Verisimilitude Theory of Science (pdf)

      • In Defense of Popperian Falsification (pdf)

      • Theory Corroboration and Football: Measuring Progress (pdf)

      • Judging Results and Theories (pdf)

      • View of a Supportive Empiricist (pdf)

      • A Trivial Disagreement? (pdf)

      • The Compleat Falsifier (pdf)

      • Clinical Versus Statistical Theory Appraisal (pdf)

      • Thoughts on Meehl's Vision of Psychological Research for the Future (pdf)

      • Can Theory Appraisal Be Quantified? (pdf)

      • The Limits of Knowledge: Bayesian Pragmatism Versus a Lakatosian Defense (pdf)

      • Meehl on Theory Appraisal (pdf)

      • Author's Response (pdf)

    • Meehl's Cliometric Metatheory Book (that was never published) in three pieces

      • Meehl, P. E. (1992) Cliometric metatheory: The actuarial approach to empirical, history-based philosophy of science. Psychological Reports, 71, 339-467. (pdf)

      • Meehl, P. E. (2002) Cliometric metatheory II: Criteria scientists use in theory appraisal and why it is rational to do so. Psychological Reports, 91, 339-404. (pdf)

      • Meehl,P. E. (2004) Cliometric metatheory III: Peircean consensus, verisimilitude, and asymptotic method. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science, 55, 615-643 (pdf)

    • Taxometrics

      • The Original Psychiatry Reports

        • Meehl, P. E. (1965). Detecting latent clinical taxa by fallible quantitative indicators lacking an accepted criterion (Report No. PR-65-2). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Research Laboratories of the Department of Psychiatry. (link)

        • Meehl, P. E. (1968). Detecting latent clinical taxa, II: A simplified procedure, some additional hitmax cut locators, a single-indicator method, and miscellaneous theorems (Report No. PR-68-4). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Research Laboratories of the Department of Psychiatry (link)

        • Meehl, P. E., Lykken, D. T., Burdick, M. R., & Schoener, G. R. (1969). Identifying latent clinical taxa, III. An empirical trial of the normal single-indicator method, using MMPI Scale 5 to identify the sexes. (Report No. PR-69-1). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Research Laboratories of the Department of Psychiatry. (link)

        • Golden, R., & Meehl, P. E. (1973). Detecting latent clinical taxa, IV: Empirical study of the maximum covariance method and the normal minimum chi-square method, using three MMPI keys to identify the sexes (Report No. PR-73-2). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Research Laboratories of the Department of Psychiatry. (link)

        • Golden, R., & Meehl, P. E. (1973). Detecting latent clinical taxa, V: A Monte Carlo study of the maximum covariance method and associated consistency tests (Report No. PR-73-3). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Research Laboratories of the Department of Psychiatry. (link)

        • Golden, R., Tyan, S., & Meehl, P. E. (1974). Detecting latent clinical taxa, VI: Analytical development and empirical trials of the consistency hurdles theory (Report No. PR-74-4). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Research Laboratories of the Department of Psychiatry. (link)

        • Golden, R., Tyan, S., & Meehl, P. E. (1974). Detecting latent clinical taxa, VII: Maximum likelihood solution and empirical and artificial data trials of the multi-indicator multi-taxonomic class normal theory (Report No. PR-74-5). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Research Laboratories of the Department of Psychiatry. (link)

        • Golden, R., & Meehl, P. E. (1974). Detecting latent clinical taxa, VIII: A preliminary study in the detection of the schizoid taxon using MMPI items as indicators (Report No. PR-74-6). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Research Laboratories of the Department of Psychiatry. (link)

        • Golden, R., Tyan, S., & Meehl, P. E. (1974). Detecting latent clinical taxa, IX: A Monte Carlo method for testing taxometric theories (Report No. PR-74-7). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota, Research Laboratories of the Department of Psychiatry. (link)

      • Will Grove's Taxometrics Page

      • Paul Meehl's Taxometrics Page

      • John Ruscio's Taxometrics Page

      • Taxometrics Resources (new page)


Selected Support Letters/Biosketches