Grant

This space is a work in progress.

  • Aims
  • Proposal

THEORY


Personality and Emotion
  • Clark, L. A., & Watson, D. (1991). Tripartite model of anxiety and depression: Psychometric evidence and taxonomic implications. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 100, 316-336. (pdf)
  • Castro-Schilo, L., Miller, S. A., & Hoffman, A. L. (2008).Mediators of the personality-affect relationship: Negative mood regulation expectancies and savoring beliefs. Poster presented at The 20th Annual Convention of the Association for Psychological Science, Chicago, Illinois.
  • Costa, P.T., & McCrae, R.R. (1980). Influence of extraversion and neuroticism on subjective well-being: Happy and unhappy people. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 38, 668–678.
  • DeNeve, K.M., & Cooper, H. (1998). The happy personality: A meta-analysis of 137 personality traits and subjective well-being. Psychological Bulletin, 124, 197–229.
  • Diener, E., & Lucas, R.E. (1999). Personality and subjective well-being. In D. Kahneman, E. Diener, & N. Schwarz (Eds.),Well-being: The foundations of hedonic psychology (pp. 213–229).  New York: Russell Sage Foundation.
  • Gross, J.J., Sutton, S.K., & Ketelaar, T. (1998). Relations between affect and personality: Support for the affect-level and affective-reactivity views. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 24, 279–288.
  • Joiner, TE., Steer, RA., Beck, AT., Schmidt, NB., Rudd, MD., & Catanzaro, SJ. (1999). Physiological hyperarousal: Construct validity of a central aspect of a tripartite model of depression and anxiety. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 108, 290-298. (pdf)
  • Kokkonen, M., & Pulkkinen, L. (2001a). Examination of the paths between personality, current mood, its evaluation, and emotion regulation.European Journal of Personality, 15, 83–104.
  • Kokkonen, M., & Pulkkinen, L. (2001b). Extraversion and neuroticism as antecedents of emotion regulation and dysregulation in adulthood.European Journal of Personality, 15, 407–424.
  • Lucas, R.E., & Baird, B.M. (2004). Extraversion and emotional reactivity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 86, 473–485.
  • Lucas, R.E., & Fujita, F. (2000). Factors influencing the relation between extraversion and pleasant affect. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 79, 1039–1056.
  • Revelle, W., & Scherer, K. R. (2009). Personality and emotion. In D. Sanders & K. Schere (Eds.)., Handbook of personality and affective science (pp. 304-305). New York:  Oxford University Press.
  • Rusting, C.L., & Larsen, R.L. (1997). Extraversion, neuroticism, and susceptibility to positive and negative affect: A test of two theoretical models.Personality and Individual Differences, 22, 607–612.
  • Tamir, M. (2005). Don’t worry, be happy? Neuroticism, trait-consistent affect regulation, and performance. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 89, 449–461.
  • Tellegen, A. (1985). Structures of mood and personality and their relevance to assessing anxiety, with an emphasis on self-report. In A.H. Tuma & J.D. Maser (Eds.), Anxiety and the anxiety disorders (pp. 681–706). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Ng, W., & Diener, E. (2009). Personality differences in emotions: Does emotion regulation play a role? Journal of Individual Differences, 30, 100-106.  (pdf)
    • Watson, D. (2002). Positive affectivity: The disposition to experience pleasurable emotional states. In . C. R. Snyder & S. J. Lopez (Eds.), The handbook of positive psychology. (pp. 77-114). New York: Oxford University Press. (pdf)
    • Watson, D., & Clark, L. A. (1984). Negative affectivity: The disposition to experience aversive emotional states.Psychological Bulletin, 96(3), 465-490. (pdf)
    Hope and Optimism

    Hopelessness and Pessimism

    Multi-Trait Multi-Method Matrices
    • Cronbach L.J. & Meehl, P.E. (1955). Construct validity in psychological tests. Psychological Bulletin, 52, 281-302. (pdf)
    • Campbell, D. T., & Fiske, D. W. (1959). Convergent and discriminant validation by the multitrait-multimethod matrix. Psychological Bulletin, 56(2), 81-105. (pdf)
    • Castro-Schilo, L., Widaman, K. F., & Grimm, K. J. (2013). Neglect the structure of multitrait-multimethod data at your peril: Implications for associations with external variables. Structural Equation Modeling, 20, 181-207
    • Eid, M. (2000). A multitrait-multimethod model with minimal assumptions. Psychometrika, 65, 241–261. 
    • Eid, M., Lischetzke, T., Nussbeck, F. W., & Trierweiler, L. I. (2003). Separating trait effects from trait-specific method effects in multitrait-multimethod models: A multiple indicator CT-C(M– 1) model. Psychological Methods, 8, 38–60.
    • Eid, M., Nussbeck, F. W., Geiser, C., Cole, D. A., Gollwitzer, M., & Lischetzke, T. (2008). Structural  equation modeling of multitrait-multimethod data: Different models for different types of  methods. Psychological Methods, 13, 230–253.
    • Kenny, D. A. (1976). An empirical application of confirmatory factor analysis to the multitrait-multimethod matrix. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 12, 247-252.
    • Kenny, D. A., & Kashy, D. A. (1992). The analysis of the multitrait–multimethod matrix by confirmatory factor analysis. Psychological Bulletin, 112, 165–172. 
    • Marsh, H. W. (1989). Confirmatory factor analysis of multitrait-multimethod data: Many problems and a few solutions. Applied Psychological Measurement, 13, 335–361. 
    • Marsh, H. W. (1993). Multitrait-multimethod analyses: Inferring each trait/method combination with multiple indicators. Applied Measurement in Education, 6, 49–81. 
    • Marsh, H. W., & Bailey, M. (1991). Confirmatory factor analysis of multitrait-multimethod data: A comparison of alternative models. Applied Psychological Measurement, 15, 47-70. 
    • Marsh, H. W., & Hocevar, D. (1988). A new, more powerful approach to multitrait-multimethod analyses: Application of second-order confirmatory factor analysis. Journal of Applied Psychology, 73, 107–117.
    • Pohl, S., & Steyer, R. (2010). Modeling common traits and method effects in multitrait-multimethod analysis. Multivariate Behavioral Research, 45, 1-28. 
    • Pohl, S., Steyer, R., & Kraus, K. (2008). Modelling method effects as individual causal effects. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society. Series A, 171, 41–63
    • Schmitt, N. (1978). Path analysis of multitrait–multimethod matrices. Applied Psychological Measurement, 2, 157–173.
    • Widaman, K. F. (2010). Multitrait-multimethod analyses. In G.R. Hancock & R. O. Mueller (Eds.), The reviewer.s guide to quantitative methods in the social sciences (pp. 299-314). Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.
    • Widaman, K. F. (1985). Hierarchically nested covariance structure models for multitrait-multimethod data. Applied Psychological Measurement,9, 1-26.

    Longitudinal Mediation
    • Cheung, M. W.-L. (2007). Comparison of approaches to constructing confidence intervals for mediating effects using structural equation models. Structural Equation Modeling, 14, 227-246.
    • Cheung, M.W.-L. (2009). Comparison of methods for constructing confidence intervals of standardized indirect effects. Behavior Research Methods41, 425-438.
    • Cheung, M.W.-L. (2009). Constructing approximate confidence intervals for parameters with structural equation models. Structural Equation Modeling16, 267-294..
    • Cole, D. A., & Maxwell, S. E. (2003). Testing meditational models with longitudinal data: Questions and tips in the use of structural equation modeling. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 112, 558–577.
    • Gollob, H. F., & Reichardt, C. S. (1987).Taking account of time lags in causal models. Child Development, 58, 80–92.
    • Gollob, H. F., & Reichardt, C. S. (1991). Interpreting and estimating indirect effects assuming time lags really matter. In L. M. Collins & J. L. Horn (Eds.) Best methods for the analysis of change: Recent advances, unanswered questions, future directions (pp. 243–259). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.
    • Maxwell, S. E., & Cole, D. A. (2007). Bias in cross-sectional analyses of longitudinal mediation.  Psychological Methods, 12(1), 23-44. 
    • MacKinnon, D. P. (2008). Introduction to statistical mediation analysis. New York: Erlbaum.
    • Preacher, K. J., & Hayes, A. F. (2008). Asymptotic and resampling strategies for assessing and comparing indirect effects in multiple mediator models.Behavior Research Methods40, 879-891.
    • Selig, J. P., & Preacher, K. J. (2009). Mediation models for longitudinal data in developmental researchResearch in Human Development6, 144-164. 
    • Shrout, P. E., & Bolger, N. (2002). Mediation in experimental and nonexperimental studies: New procedures and recommendations. Psychological Methods, 7, 422-445
    • Venter, A., Maxwell, S. E., & Bolig, E. (2002). Power in randomized group comparisons: The value of adding a single intermediate time point to a traditional pretest-postest design. Psychological Methods, 7(2), 194-209.
    METHODS

    Participants

    Materials
    • Bryant, F. B. (2003). Savoring Beliefs Inventory (SBI): A scale for measuring beliefs about savoring. Journal of Mental Health, 12(2), 175-196. (pdf
    • Catanzaro, S. J., & Mearns, J. (1990). Measuring generalized expectancies for negative mood regulation: Initial scale development and implications. Journal of Personality Assessment, 54, 546-563. (pdf)
    • John, O. P., & Srivastava, S. (1999). The Big Five trait taxonomy: History, measurement, and theoretical perspectives. In L. A. Pervin & O. P. John (Eds.), Handbook of personality: Theory and research (2nd ed., pp. 102-138). New York: Guilford. (pdf
    • Larsen, R. J., & Diener, E. (1987). Affect intensity as an individual difference characteristic: A review. Personality and Individual Differences, 21, 1-39. (pdf)
    • McCrae, R. R., Costa, P. T., Jr., & Martin, T. A. (2005). The NEO-PI-3: A more readible, revised NEO personality inventory. Journal of Personality Assessment, 84(3), 261-270. (pdf)  
    • Saucier, G. (1994). Mini-Markers: A brief version of Goldberg's unipolar Big Five markers.  Journal of Personality Assessment,  63(3)3, 505-516. (pdf)
    • Watson, D., Clark, L. A., & Tellegen, A. (1988). Development and validation of brief measures of Positive and Negative Affect: The PANAS scales. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 54,1063-1070. (pdf) (doc) (SPSS scoring)
    • Watson, D., Weber, K., Assenheimer, J. S., Clark, L. A., Strauss, M. E., & McCormick, R. A. (1995). Testing a tripartite model: I. Evaluating the convergent and discriminant validity of anxiety and depression symptom scales. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 104, 3-14. (pdf)
    • Watson, D., Clark, L. A., Weber, K., Assenheimer, J. S., Strauss, M. E., & McCormick, R. A. (1995). Testing a tripartite model: II. Exploring the symptom structure of anxiety and depression in student, adult, and patient samples. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 104, 15-25. (pdf)
    Procedures
    • Shapiro, D. N., Chandler, J., & Mueller, P. A. (2013). Using mechanical turk to study clinical populations. Clinical Psychological Science, 1, 213-220.
    RESULTS
    • Database in SPSS (no data)
    • Scoring Measures (SPSS)
    • Confirmatory Factor Analyses (Mplus code)
      • NMRE
        • Self
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
        • P1
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
        • P2
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
        • Disentangling self and other across time
      • SBI
        • Self
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
        • P1
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
        • P2
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
        • Disentangling self and other across time
      • PANAS-PA
        • Self
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
        • P1
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
        • P2
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
        • Disentangling self and other across time
      • PANAS-NA
        • Self
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
        • P1
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
        • P2
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
      • PANAS Overall
        • Self
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
        • P1
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
        • P2
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
      • PHA
        • Self
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
        • P1
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
        • P2
          • T1
          • T2
          • T3
      • BFI
        • O
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
        • C
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
        • E
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
        • A
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
        • N
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • All
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • All across time
      • NEO
        • O
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
        • C
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
        • E
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
        • A
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
        • N
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
        • Overall
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • Overall across time
      • Mini-Markers
        • O
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
        • C
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
        • E
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
        • A
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
        • N
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
        • Overall
          • Self
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P1
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
          • P2
            • T1
            • T2
            • T3
      • MTMM Analysis
        • T1
        • T2
        • T3
      • The Big Kahuna MTMM
      • The BIg Kahuna Mediation
    Comments